The Fall Of Narcissus, 2015

Stop Motion Animation

details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

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On His Way Down, 2015

10 x 15 cm

Mixed Media
Triptych
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

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Narcissus Glu glu glu, 2015

40.5 x 51 cm

Mixed media
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
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Narcissus, 2015

12 x 13 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
5 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
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Narcissus, 2015

12.5 x 10 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
6 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
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Narcissus, 2015

15.5 x 14 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
11 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
close

Narcissus, 2015

17.5 x 14 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
15 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
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Narcissus, 2015

17.5 x 14 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
16 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
close

Narcissus, 2015

17.5 x 14 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
19 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
close

Narcissus, 2015

17.5 x 12.5 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
21 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
close

Narcissus, 2015

21.5 x 13 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
24 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
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Narcissus, 2015

23 x 17 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
25 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
close

Narcissus, 2015

33 x 36.5 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
34 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
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Narcissus, 2015

34 x 25.5 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
35 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
close

Narcissus, 2015

35 x 25 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
39 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
close

Narcissus, 2015

35 x 36.5 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
41 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
close

Narcissus, 2015

38 x 36.5 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
43 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
close

Narcissus, 2015

47 x 35 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
45 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
close

Narcissus, 2015

50 x 47.5 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
47 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

close
close

Narcissus, 2015

70 x 51.5 cm

Pen on cut paper in acrylic box with mirror
51 out of 56
details statement

Being caught between “Narcissus” and his reflection was a disparaging place to be in. My way of enduring such an unstable yet intense liaison was through extensive written auto analyses, compiled throughout most of the courtship. From the very first verse and in good reason, my then love took the persona of “Narcissus”, the young man from Greek mythology who falls in love with his own reflection in the water. After a combination of different letters, poems, compilations of thoughts and countless failed attempts to capture his attention, like Narcissus, our relationship drowned in a sea of his self-absorption. To emulate the idea of extreme vanity, these written contemplations were paralleled with the mythological character by inclining each word to face a metaphorical pool of water, a mirror, on the bottom of each piece. The process of transcribing 56 different narrations using ink on paper and consequently cutting the top of each word with an x-acto knife in order to fold them, was a way to represent, resolve and simultaneously get rid of a destructive relationship, which after all, gave birth to a fruitful oeuvre.

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